PBS Newshour. Families of Colombia’s disappeared endure ‘never-ending grief’ and a wrenching search

In Colombia, an estimated 83,000 people have been forcibly disappeared since 1958. But peace accords between the government and the FARC, the country’s largest guerrilla group, in 2016 mandated that finding the missing was a necessary step toward reconciliation. Special correspondent Nadja Drost reports from Colombia on how loved ones suffering a “never-ending grief” are searching for closure.

Venezuela’s political battle over foreign aid turns to violent confrontation

Violent protests erupted this past weekend in Venezuela over humanitarian aid shipments into the country. Meanwhile, Vice President Pence traveled to Colombia to meet with opposition leader Juan Guaido, promising that the U.S. would increase sanctions on Venezuela in an attempt to oust President Maduro, and calling for other countries to do the same. Special correspondent Nadja Drost reports.

Why Venezuela’s Chavistas are fiercely loyal to Maduro, despite economic crisis

Violence has broken out in Venezuela as opposition groups, led by Juan Guaido, attempt to bring in foreign aid against the will of President Nicolas Maduro. Despite international support for Guaido, a fiercely loyal minority of Venezuelans known as Chavistas are determined to keep Maduro in power — and the U.S. out. Special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report.

PBS Newshour. FARC drops its weapons, but Colombia’s deadly conflict goes on

 

Despite the peace deal, new waves of deadly violence are hitting many areas of Colombia, especially those once under FARC-rebel control. And it’s targeting the very people — activists and social leaders — for whom the peace deal was supposed to make life safer. Special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

PBS Newshour. As Venezuela’s economy plummets, mass exodus ensues

Despite having the largest oil reserves in the world, Venezuela’s economy is in a freefall, necessities have become scarce and tens of thousands of residents are fleeing across the border to Colombia. For the PBS Newshour, with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report on the exodus.

Dire conditions drive anti-government protest in Venezuela. PBS Newshour

Venezuela is in freefall after years of recession, skyrocketing inflation and a formidable food crisis, sparking outcry and protest. It’s pushed angry Venezuelans to take to the streets on a regular basis, demanding that President Nicolas Maduro step down, and inspired a fierce government crackdown. Special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report.

The Overseas Press Club Award for our PBS Newshour series “Fight for Peace.”

C7jHsv3WkAEJUS0.jpg_largeVery happy our series, with Nadja Drost, about Colombia’s peace process for the PBS NewsHour received the Overseas Press Club Award for best reporting on Latin America. Thank you to PBS for giving us the opportunity to tell this important story to the North American public and to join this super team of producers: Morgan Till, Patti Parson, and Sara Just.

Here are the reports in the award-winning series:

Can Colombia rework its FARC deal without jeopardizing peace? PBS NewsHour

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos joins PBS NewsHour

What peace in Colombia would mean for the drug trade and those who depend on it. PBS NewsHour

Inside Colombia’s jungles, how FARC rebels are preparing for peace. PBS NewsHour