PBS Newshour. FARC drops its weapons, but Colombia’s deadly conflict goes on

 

Despite the peace deal, new waves of deadly violence are hitting many areas of Colombia, especially those once under FARC-rebel control. And it’s targeting the very people — activists and social leaders — for whom the peace deal was supposed to make life safer. Special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Italy discouraging flow of migrants from North Africa

Italy has received 500,000 migrants and refugees from North Africa who have fled war, extreme poverty and oppression during the last three years. But the country, which had a reputation of welcoming migrants, has received backlash for it and is starting to discourage the migrant flow. For the NewsHour Weekend with Special Correspondent Nadja Drost reports.

PBS Newshour. As Venezuela’s economy plummets, mass exodus ensues

Despite having the largest oil reserves in the world, Venezuela’s economy is in a freefall, necessities have become scarce and tens of thousands of residents are fleeing across the border to Colombia. For the PBS Newshour, with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report on the exodus.

PBS Newshour: Venezuelans suffer deadly scarcity of food and medicine

With the economy in freefall, Venezuelans face nationwide shortages of food at runaway inflation prices, and children are suffering the most: severe malnutrition among kids is rising at an alarming rate. Special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report for the PBS Newshour in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting on the harmful shortages of food and medicine.

Dire conditions drive anti-government protest in Venezuela. PBS Newshour

Venezuela is in freefall after years of recession, skyrocketing inflation and a formidable food crisis, sparking outcry and protest. It’s pushed angry Venezuelans to take to the streets on a regular basis, demanding that President Nicolas Maduro step down, and inspired a fierce government crackdown. Special correspondent Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report.

The Overseas Press Club Award for our PBS Newshour series “Fight for Peace.”

C7jHsv3WkAEJUS0.jpg_largeVery happy our series, with Nadja Drost, about Colombia`s peace process with the PBS NewsHour received the Overseas Press Club Award for best reporting on Latin America. Thank you to PBS for giving us the opportunity to tell this important story to the North American public and to join this super team of producers Morgan Till, Patti Parson, Sara Just.

Those are the reports awarded:

Can Colombia rework its FARC deal without jeopardizing peace? PBS NewsHour

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos joins PBS NewsHour

What peace in Colombia would mean for the drug trade and those who depend on it. PBS NewsHour

Inside Colombia’s jungles, how FARC rebels are preparing for peace. PBS NewsHour

 

Can Colombia rework its FARC deal without jeopardizing peace? PBS NewsHour

Colombia was on the verge of ending one of the most violent civil wars in Latin America just slightly more than a month ago, when the deal was narrowly rejected by a voter referendum. President Juan Manuel Santos now faces the challenge of re-writing the deal to make it favorable to those who voted against it while still keeping it agreeable to FARC. Special correspondent Nadja Drost reports.

The Coal Line

A short documentary, with Nadja Drost, and produced with Re:Common, that investigates allegations that an American coal company, Drummond Ltd., financed and  colluded with violent paramilitary groups who exercised a scorch-earth policy near the company’s mine in northern Colombia. May, 2016.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos joins PBS NewsHour

When Colombian voters rejected a peace deal with FARC rebels, “I saw a country … divided in half,” President Juan Manuel Santos told special correspondent Nadja Drost for the PBS NewsHour. “I went out and recognized the result, which is what any president and any citizen should do.” He also told the NewsHour that time is the biggest challenge to getting a new peace deal.